At the Water’s Edge: A Review

2 Pretzels At the Water’s Edge, Sara Gruen Hey, Fort Smithians, Smoky Lynx here, and I have the most unimportant news ever. I read a book about privileged rich kids and, boy, was it only mildly entertaining. While the book opens with a scene set in Scotland, a woman who has just lost her child gettingContinue reading “At the Water’s Edge: A Review”

My Brain is Barren Wasteland

Lookie here, a few weeks ago, I started a new job that is 1000% centered around numbers. Now, I didn’t go to school for math, so it’s taking every last bit of my brain power. The result is, I’m not reading as much as I did when I was on full blown lock down. I’mContinue reading “My Brain is Barren Wasteland”

What in God’s Name: The 2020 Story

I’m just kidding. It’s a book about Heaven, Inc. 4 Pretzels. Look, this book has gotten a bad rap on Goodreads, and I just don’t get it. It’s clever, light-hearted, and funny. So, exactly what we need right now. Let’s get into, shall we? What in God’s Name (Simon Rich) is about a couple of lowContinue reading “What in God’s Name: The 2020 Story”

The Fangs are Grade-A Wackadoos

The Family Fang, Kevin Wilson 4 Pretzels After reading Nothing to See Here, I wanted more Kevin Wilson. Funny enough, The Family Fang has a connection to Nothing to See Here.  So, what’s up with the Fangs? Caleb and Camille Fang are performance artists. They have two children, Annie and Buster, (they refer to them as Child A and Child B).Continue reading “The Fangs are Grade-A Wackadoos”

Life of Pi: A Review

“Life is so beautiful that death has fallen in love with it, a jealous, possessive love that grabs at what it can.” Life of Pi 5 Pretzels Thanks to Tiger King, there’s been a lot of tiger talk on the socials lately. How about a tiger story that isn’t full of smarmy scumbags? This blogContinue reading “Life of Pi: A Review”

Nothing to See Here: A Review

“Why didn’t we act like normal people instead of huddling in the stacks, our bodies shiny with fire gel?” – Nothing to See Here, Kevin Wilson  For a book that is, at its core, about abandoned children, this book is hysterical. The dialogue, the prose, all of it.